Common Core Standards

Below you will find the activities from my blog organized by the Common Core State Standards outcomes. The standards included here can be found on the CCSS site along with additional info about this initiative.

 

English Language Arts – Literacy: Language

Adjective Comparison: See activity here.

  • Literacy.L.3.1g “Form and use comparative and superlative adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on what is to be modified.”

 

English Language Arts – Reading: Literature

(Activities are listed by CCSS in chart form here.)

Travel Posters: Using the text and illustrations from a book, students create a travel poster to encourage classmates to “visit” the setting of their story. See activity here.

Shadow Boxes: Using the text and illustrations from a book, students create a shadow box to illustrate a pivotal scene from the story. See activity here.

  • RL.3.7. “Explain how specific aspects of a text’s illustrations contribute to what is conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or setting).”
  • RL.2.7. “Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot.”
  • RL.4.3. “Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).”

 

Wordless Books and Writers: Using the story of The Lion and the Mouse as a jumping off point, students can engage in a variety of reading and writing projects. See activity here.

  • RL.2.2. & 3.2. “Recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral.”
  • RL.2.9. “Compare and contrast two or more versions of the same story (e.g., Cinderella stories) by different authors or from different cultures.”

 

The Answers to Life’s Questions: Using Tolstoy’s story The Three Questions, students explore themes and the power of illustrations in adding meaning to a story. See activity here.

Why Can’t We All Just Get Along?: Lessons about bullying are brought home in the story of Nora the Nonapus written and illustrated by 5th graders. See activity here.

  • RL.3.7. “Explain how specific aspects of a text’s illustrations contribute to what is conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or setting).”
  • RL.4.2. “Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.”

 

The Friendly Beasts: See activity here.

  • RL.2.9. “Compare and contrast two or more versions of the same story (e.g., Cinderella stories) by different authors or from different cultures.”

 

Book Response Task Cards: See activity here.

  • RL.3.1. “Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.”
  • RL.3.3. “Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.”
  • RL.3.7. “Explain how specific aspects of a text’s illustrations contribute to what is conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or setting).”

 

English Language Arts – Writing

Stories of Life: Using biographies for inspiration and structure, students write a narrative (a mini-bio) from their own life. See activity here.

  • W.2.3. “Write narratives in which they recount a well-elaborated event or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide a sense of closure.”
  • W.3.3., 4.3., & 5.3. “Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.”